Celebrating 150 Years of MSU: What It Means for You!

Minnesota State is set to celebrate a major milestone in 2018 as it will celebrate its 150th birthday.

“It’s a huge milestone for our institution,” Paul Hustoles, chair of the 150th observance, said. “It gives us an opportunity to really look at our past and an opportunity to think about the next 150 years. It’s not every day you get to celebrate your 150th birthday.”

Founded on Oct. 7, 1868, MSU is Minnesota’s third oldest university behind Winona State University (1858) and the University of Minnesota (1851). MSU has been celebrating over the last year and it will cap off the celebrations with homecoming and a few other events in the coming weeks.

“We have had more than 150 events during the past year, including this past summer,” Hustoles said. “We are just coming into our ‘grand finale week.'”

The full schedule of events for the 150th Celebration Week, courtesy of Paul Hustoles.

Celebration events include the “Stomping Through the Decades” Homecoming Parade, several presentations, dedications to MSU buildings, speakers and more. Saturday, Oct. 6 marks the finale of the celebration and will be the Birthday Bash party in the CSU.

“We are taking over the CSU and it should be a great time,” Hustoles said. “Of course we will have cake and ice cream, but also fun and games, a variety show, a big dance and an amazing laser show projected onto to the CSU.”

Hustoles said the event is free to “every member of our MSU community” and more details regarding the event should be available soon. He also stressed the importance of celebrating the university’s milestone.

“Current students will forever be part of our history. [There’s] no time like the present to celebrate our collective past and our anticipated future,” he said.

For more information about MSU’s 150th Observance, please contact Paul Hustoles at paul.hustoles@mnsu.edu or visit www.mnsu.edu/150/.

CSU Journey Painting

by AFURE ADAH, CSU Communications Student Staff

In honor of the 150th Anniversary of our school, I thought I would throw it back to the “Journey” painting in the CSU. I am sure many of you have noticed and walked by the beautiful painting by  nationally renowned painter, Marian Anderson. Since it is such an iconic historical painting here at our school I’m going to give you some back story on the piece.

Let’s first take a look at the image and some of the iconic locations featured in it. Notable buildings include the Taylor Center (bottom middle), Ostrander Bell Tower (top right) and the fountain (middle). The right side features a highlight on athletics including a tip of the hat to the 2009 Women’s Basketball Team, who won the National Championship. The planes in the top left corner are a metaphor to “represent the promise of tomorrow.”

The painting was created by Minnesota native, Marian Anderson, who said she had to experience and get a feeling of campus before she could paint it. Her vision for the piece came from enthusiasm shared by alumni and the campus community after a tour of campus. Anderson said her vision wasn’t about capturing a collection of campus buildings, but instead, about bringing pride and promise to the canvas.

The montage is a journey that carries the viewer through the past to the ever evolving future at MSU Mankato. The amount of symbolism in the piece is almost endless, but as a whole, Marian said she wanted to “ignite people’s thinking so it will bring out their memories on their own” and to “deliver the promise of the future.”

So now that you know the story behind “Journey,” I encourage you to take a closer look and be inspired.

Your First College Homecoming: Competition to Shape Your ‘Mav Fam’ Experience

By Brett Marshall, CSU Communications Student Assistant

Undoubtedly, some of your fondest high school memories came from your homecoming. You shouldn’t expect that to change as you prepare for your first college homecoming.

Though both are homecomings, the way the weeks are constructed are vastly different. High school homecomings tend to be more “themed” and involve things happening between classes. Remember dress-up days? College homecoming is nothing like that.

In college, no one cares if you’re a freshman or a senior – when homecoming hits, we’re just one big Mav Fam! That said where competition does heat up is between RSOs. MSU homecoming has teams that are formed by RSOs who compete in a variety of events such as a food eating contest, lip sync battle, parade float building, dodgeball, school spirit and more!

Each event awards the RSO points and at the end of the week, the RSO that accumulates the most points receives a cash prize. Most high schools don’t have cash incentives nor do they have events throughout the week.

Another highlight of homecoming is the concert. This year, the Student Events Team is bringing in world-renowned rapper, Fetty Wap (with special guest Silento – you know, the Whip-NaeNae guy). The concerts are always high-energy and this concert should be no different! Be sure to visit mnsuevents.com and get your ticket if you haven’t already.

It’s a week filled with opportunities and memories! If your RSO isn’t participating as a team, you should still try your best to make it to as many events as you can! I’ve taken the time to outline a few of my favorite events below.

  1. Bonfire and Fireworks – see how fast a tower of wood palates goes up in flames – Monday, Sept. 24 at 8 p.m. behind Blakeslee Stadium
  2. Lip Sync – perhaps the most popular and most fun competitions during Homecoming Week ends with the crowning of new royalty – Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7 p.m. in Bresnan Arena
  3. Fetty Wap Concert – one of two major concerts each year – Friday, Sept. 28 at 7 p.m. in Myers Field House
  4. 150th Homecoming Parade – the downtown anniversary parade is a once-in-a-lifetime experience – Saturday, Sept. 29 at 10 a.m. in Downtown Mankato
  5. Football Game – what’s Homecoming without a football game – Saturday Sept. 29 against St. Cloud at 2 p.m. at Blakeslee Stadium. GO MAVERICKS!

Those are all events you don’t want to miss! Click HERE to view a full schedule of events. Homecoming is one of the best weeks of the year, so be sure to make the most of it!

 

 

Cheer on Mavericks Football For Opportunity To Win A $500 Scholarship

By Alejandro Reyes Vega, CSU Communications Student Assistant

Students are always in search of money, after all, we have a lot of bills to pay and not a lot of time to make money. With that being said, how does a $500 scholarship sound?!

At every Maverick home football game, there will be an opportunity for a lucky student to obtain a $500 scholarship given by Dr. Pepper. If you are a student and would like the chance to win, then stop by the Hot 96.7 van before the game or at the Student’s Rewards booth before the end of the first quarter.

You must have a current MSU student ID!

At halftime, the lucky student will be drawn, and they have 96.7 seconds to get to the midfield and claim their reward.

You must be present to win!

Here are the dates of the Maverick home football games:

  • Sept. 29 (Homecoming) at 2 p.m.
  • Oct. 13 at 1 p.m.
  • Nov. 3 at 12 p.m.
  • Nov. 10 at 12 p.m.

FAST PASS WEDNESDAYS COMING TO THE CSU

Every Wednesday in the CSU, Athletics does tabling, so make sure to stop by and see Stomper as well as some of the student-athletes. Later in the year, students will be able to pick up their Hockey Fast Passes on Wednesday’s in CSU123. Watch for more info!

Students Can Grab a Bus To the Homecoming Parade

By Alejandro Reyes Vega, CSU Communications Student Assistant

For the first time in decades, the MSU Homecoming Parade will march through Downtown Mankato to celebrate the 150th (Sesquicentennial) Year of Minnesota State University, Mankato.

More than 100 units will participate in this year’s parade making the largest one in recent history.

The route begins at the corner of South Broad Street and East Liberty. It will meander down Broad,  Cherry, Second,  and Main Streets before turning onto Riverfront drive and ending at East Rock Street.

The best place to watch the parade will be on South Broad Street between East Liberty and East Cherry. The second-best place is in South Second Street between East Cherry and East Main.

The City of Mankato will provide specific Homecoming shuttles for students and other community members from campus to downtown the morning of the parade.

Look for purple wrapped sesquicentennial University buses for transportation from campus to the parade.

Buses start their routes at 7 a.m. and additional buses will be added after 8 a.m. and will make trips every seven minutes up until 2 p.m.

Buses will run from the Nelson Hall Bus Bench and the McElroy Bus Shelter to a temporary transit hub in the 600 block of Broad Street in downtown Mankato.

Students will depart near the St. Johns Baptist Catholic Church, just two blocks from the parade route on South Front Street. The free President’s Pancake Breakfast (7:30 a.m.-10 a.m.) will be four blocks away near the Civic Center Plaza by the Verizon Wireless Center.

For parade participants, if you’re not using the shuttle buses, park in the Mankato West High Parking Lot. At the end of the parade, the City of Mankato will start shuttling parade participants near the termination of the route at East Rock Street back to the West High Parking Lot. The estimated frequency for this shuttle is 20 minutes depending on traffic.

Brandon Weideman Carries the Torch That Sparks Tradition and Campus Pride

By Morgan Stolpa, CSU PR Intern

Greek Life, Coronation and the Homecoming Parade are all part of the spirit and tradition of college life at Minnesota State Mankato that build lifelong memories, friendships and the sense of Maverick Pride.

Creating memories on-campus is a vital part of the college experience.

At Minnesota State Mankato there’s an activity or event for everyone. Whether you’re a new student or alumni, there are plenty of opportunities to meet new people, create memories and be a part of some memorable Minnesota State Mankato traditions. Sustaining and building upon those student-focused traditions rests with Brandon Weideman,2018-19 spirit and traditions chair on the Student Events Team.

“We need traditions because they reinforce values and give students a sense of history and what came before them. They also provide students with something exciting they can look forward to year after year,” said Weideman.

You may not have realized you’ve been a part of a tradition on Minnesota State Mankato’s campus, but if you’ve ever attended a homecoming football game, participated in the Maverick Day of Service, watched a movie at Stomper’s Cinema or attended a number of events and activities on-campus, you have been.

“We are using these traditions to pass on the history and spirit of this university through the generations. So that when a graduate from 2018 talks to a graduate from 1988, they can both relate and talk about the same things they did in college and the fun they had because the traditions created a commonality between them and this wonderful University,” said Weideman.

As with many traditions, the more things change – the more they stay the same. Current student may put a modern twist on time-tested event. Still, the memories remain basically the same between current students and alumni. It’s a bond that is shared and passed along as part of the Minnesota State Mankato college experience.

“We maintain the energy around building a tradition by continuing to do it year after year, improving it and getting feedback, and then cementing the tradition in place,” said Weideman.

Throughout the year, there are so many traditional events and activities on-campus that the university has created a bucket list of activities students MUST attend. If you’re interested in being a part of history go to: https://mankato.mnsu.edu/current-students/university-traditions/.

 

Minnesota State University, Mankato, Dean’s Office Hires Furry Advisor

By: Morgan Stolpa

Incoming and returning students alike could relieve stress on-campus in a way they never could have imagined.

How Willow’s position began:

“We are always looking for new and creative ways to interact with students. Research shows animals can have a positive impact on reducing stress, anxiety etc. which are all things that come with the college experience. Academic advising can also be stressful and we understand a number of students leave a family pet at home when they go away to college. Knowing what a great temperament Willow has I pitched the idea to our Dean, he loved it and I ran with it from there,” said Student Relations Coordinator, Gina Maahs-Zurbey.

How the idea got started:

Zurbey was working in the Dean’s Office as a Student Relations Coordinator when she came up with the idea to incorporate a therapy dog into the office regularly throughout the semester. The process was long, but Zurbey worked hard to see her idea come to life. “All in all, it was about a year and a half in the making. Everything from the training, testing and working with MSU Administration to get Willow Wednesdays approved,” said Zurbey.

About Willow:

Instead of advising students, Willow provides comfort to them. The 3-year-old Labradoodle receives visitors every Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in her office located in Armstrong Hall, Room 226. She even has a plague that says “Willow Room” right outside of her door.

About Therapy Dogs on College Campuses:

Universities all across the United State use therapy dogs to encourage students to be more comfortable, healthy and stress free. At MSU, a permanent therapy dog holds weekly sessions to heal students and faculty both mentally and physically. Additionally, MSU hosts several events on-campus with therapy dogs, “Kanine Kisses and Hound Hugs,” which are held every third Thursday of the month in the Centennial Student Union in the Lincoln Lounge. There are several sessions held during both spring and fall final’s weeks on-campus.

College students experience an overwhelming amount of stress during the school year. Whether it be volunteering, working, studying, or missing the comforts of home. Students need a heathy outlet to relieve their stress. The University understands the importance of their student’s physical and mental health which is why they regularly incorporate therapy dogs on their campus.

There are no appointments required:

Anyone can simply as stop by the Dean’s Officein Armstrong Hall, room 226 and sign a liability waiver. After signing a waiver, students are encouraged to play, pet and even give Willow treats. If students ask nicely with please or pretty please she can perform a number of tricks from sit to speak.

Students are encouraged to visit Willow every Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. If interested, students can contact Gina Maahs-Zurbey at gina.maahs-zurbey@mnsu.eduor drop by the advising office, Room 226 in Armstrong Hall to sign a liability waiver and meet Willow, the Labradoodle. For further questions, contact the Dean’s Office.

Struggling? Check These Places Out!

By: Alejandro Reyes Vega, CSU PR Intern

Students often deal with issues that vary from feeling too much pressure, stress and lack of sleep to depression, anxiety or family problems. The counseling center is here for all those needs and many more.

They are confidential! Anything shared will stay confidential within the patient and the therapist. No one has access to it including, parents, coaches, and teachers.

Students get up to ten confidential individual sessions per year. The center also offers group counseling and couples therapy and these do not count towards a student’s ten free sessions.

The counseling center also has a great series of psycho-educational workshops called Discovering Yourself. These take about fifty minutes and the topics range from procrastination, test anxiety, getting good sleep and other useful topics aimed at improving college life.

They also offer consultation services to parents, faculty, and staff and they have information on Outreach and Educational programming.

For more information on the Counseling Center CLICK HERE.

Other places to consider where they always welcome other students include:

The LGBT Center is a safe space for all individuals. It is our mission to provide support, advocacy, and a sense of community to LGBT* students. Through education, programming, and activism, we heighten campus and community awareness of LGBT* concerns and strive to ensure every individual has equal opportunity to learn, work, and grow in a supportive and safe environment.  Stop on in anytime for a free cup of tea and learn more about our community!

LGBT Center

Laura Schultz is one of the people in charge of the Violence Awareness and Response Program. The program offers confidential advocacy to students who are victims, survivors and intimate partner violence.

Legal options are available as well as, reporting on campus, support for emotional struggle and no matter what students are looking to achieve, the center can help them get in touch with the appropriate resources.

Women’s Center

 

 

Therapy Dog Sessions Return Sept. 20 at 6:30 p.m.

Health 101 Students Can Attend To Fill Class Requirement

The dogs are back!

Hound Hugs and Kanine Kisses, the monthly therapy dog session hosted by the Centennial Student Union, will be Thursday, Sept. 20 in the CSU Lincoln Lounge.

This year’s sessions will have minor changes from last year’s popular event said Lenny Koupal, CSU communications coordinator.

“The new time will be 6:30 to 8 p.m.,” said Koupal, who coordinates the CSU Program. “The group is now known as Paws for Friendship. It will be the same volunteers and their wonderful dogs. They just go by a different name.”

For several years, the CSU has offered therapy dog sessions – first as a Finals Week StressBuster event.

“We added monthly therapy dog sessions after students requested more frequent therapy dog visits. We’ve designated the third Thursday of each month throughout the academic year as Hound Hugs and Kanine Kisses night.” Koupal added.

The event is free. Visitors need only to sign University’s liability waiver.

Koupal said the event remains among the most popular activities in the CSU.

“In last spring’s CSU student survey, students ranked the therapy dog sessions as the third most popular reason for coming to the CSU behind Career Fairs and Stomper’s Cinema,” Koupal said. “These sessions are both welcome and needed as students move through their academic year.”

Dr. Mary Kramer, faculty member with the department of health science, said students enrolled in the Health 101 are encouraged to attend therapy dog sessions as part of three required wellness activities. Students then share their experiences as part of their assignment.

“The reflections are phenomenal,” Kramer said. Some share personal reflections. Others observe the impact the dogs have on other students.

“For some, it reminds them of home and their dog,” Kramer added. “It helps them forget about high anxiety issues in their lives.”

Kramer said the health science department is working on a survey on the impact of therapy dog sessions on college students.

“We are interested to learn more about therapy dogs and students.There’s so much research on the benefits, yet there’s almost nothing out there on (the impact on) college students. ,” Kramer said. “There’s just something we don’t understand on the power of the dog – just putting a hand on a dog – that energy transfer between the person and the dog. It’s magical.”

Service Animals, Emotional Support Animals, Therapy Animals

By: Morgan Stolpa

Minnesota State University, Mankato is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities.

A “service animal” is a dog that is trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. “Service dogs are allowed to go anywhere their owner goes on campus,” said Julie Snow.

However, the University may ask if the animal is required because of a disability as well as what work the animal has been trained to perform.

Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • Assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks;
  • Alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds;
  • Providing non-violent protection or rescue work;
  • Pulling a wheelchair;
  • Assisting an individual during a seizure;
  • Retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone;
  • Providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities;
  • Helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors.

“Owners are not required to register with Accessibility Resources unless they need other accommodations to ensure access to the University programs and facilities,” said Snow.

Emotional Support Animal:

An “emotional support animal” (ESA) is an animal that provides comfort to an individual with a disability upon the recommendation of a healthcare or mental health professional.

An emotional support animal does not assist a person with a disability with activities of daily living but rather its role is to live with a student and alleviate the symptoms of an individual’s disability to provide equal opportunities to use and enjoy housing at the University.

Upon approval, ESA’s are allowed in residence halls but must agree to the following expectations:

  1. Emotional support animals assisting individuals with disabilities are only allowed in their owner’s residence hall room and/or apartment unit and the most direct route to and from the exterior door of the building. Emotional support animals are not allowed in classrooms or any public facilities at Minnesota State University, Mankato.
  2. Licensure & Vaccination: Emotional support animals on campus must comply with all state & local licensure and vaccination requirements. Dogs must wear a license tag and a current rabies vaccination tag.
  3. Leash: Emotional support animals must be on a leash at all times when outside of the owner/keepers residential hall room/apartment, unless impracticable or unfeasible due to owner/keeper’s disability.
  4. Under control: The owner/keeper of an emotional support animal must be in full control of the animal at all times. The animal must not be disruptive (for example by barking) and cannot pose a direct threat to the health and safety of others on campus.
  5. The animal must be crated when owner is not in the room: An individual with a disability may be asked to remove an emotional support animal from University housing if the animal is out of control and the animal’s handler does not take effective action to control it.  A person who has an emotional support animal on campus (including University Housing) is financially responsible for property damage caused by his or her emotional support animal.
  6. Clean-up: The care and supervision of an emotional support animal is the responsibility of the individual who uses the animal’s service. This includes clean-up of all animal waste. University Grounds/Maintenance and Residential Life may designate animal toileting areas. Those who are unable to physically pick up and dispose of feces are responsible for making all necessary arrangements for assistance on a daily basis.

Students interested in ESA’s can make an appointment with Julie Snow, Accessibility Resources Director, to discuss their circumstances and learn about the ESA documentation process. Students will need to:

  1. Provide documentation of their disability.
  2. Supply documentation from their provider verifying the ESA is part of the student’s therapeutic plan.

Therapy Animal:

Therapy animals provide affection and comfort to various members of the public, typically in facility settings such as hospitals, assisted living, and schools. These pets have a special aptitude for interacting with members of the public and enjoy doing so. Therapy animal owners volunteer their time to visit with their animal in the community. A therapy animal has no special rights of access, except in those facilities where they are welcomed. They may not enter businesses with “no pets” policies or accompany their handler in the cabin of an airplane regardless of their therapy animal designation.

Service dog owners with questions or concerns can contact Julie Snow in Accessibility Resources for assistance and/or clarification. Phone: 507-389-2825 (v) 800-627-3529 or 711 (MRS/TTY) or via email julie.snow@mnsu.edu.