December 2017 RSO : MNSU Public Relations Society of America ( PRSSA )

Get to know PRSSA

  1. What is the focus of your organization and what are some of the activities you conduct? We are one of many chapters of a national PRSSA organization. We talk about what is going on in the PR world and how to prepare for our future career.
  2. When did your organization start at Minnesota State University, Mankato? Our organization was started in 2002 by Dr. Jane McConnell.
  3. How many members do you currently have? We currently have 29 members.
  4. How often do you meet?  We meet every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. in the Heritage Room.
  5. What leadership positions can someone hold within your chapter?  We have the positions of president, Vice President, treasurer, social media chair, tours and speakers chair, and volunteer and fundraising chair.
  6. What are your goals of your organization and how to you attain them? Our goal is to further educate students as to what PR is, and to help increase their skills beyond the classroom prior to graduation.
  7. What is the greatest achievement your organization has received? Our greatest achievement would be in the connections that we get to make by visiting real PR firms in the cities as well as speaking with professionals at our meetings.
  8. How do you join? Anyone can join! Just show up to a meeting. However, there is a $75 fee to be a recognized member.
  9. Why should someone join your organization? PRSSA is a great experience for anyone. It is a great way to build connections, practice skills and to get ahead in the field of public relations. – Jennifer Skalicky, president of MNSU PRSSA

Connect with PRSSA on Facebook 

October 2017 RSO: Black Motivated Women

Get to know Black Motivated Women – Mankato

  1. What is the focus of your organization? The purpose of Black Motivated Women is to provide a safe space for African and African-American women on campus to voice our opinions on social, economic and political issues as they pertain to the black community.
  2. When did your organization start on our campus? How many members do you currently have?The organization was created in 2014, but was brought back to the MNSU campus officially in the fall of 2017. We currently have a consistent 35 members, but over the past few weeks we have had a maximum of about 60 students attending our meetings.
  3. How often do you meet? What offices do you offer within the chapter? We meet bi-weekly on Thursdays from 6pm-7:30pm. Location varies between CSU 238 and CSU 253/4/5 depending on the week. We typically send the specifics of each meeting in an email to our members.
  4. What are your goals? Our biggest goals are empowering women of color on campus, strengthening the bonds of black women here in Mankato, and bridging the achievement gap. We want our girls to graduate and excel in life after college.
  5. What is the greatest achievement your organization has received? Receiving October RSO of the month has been the greatest achievement for our organization.
  6. How do you join? Joining BMW is simple! All students have to do is attend one of our meetings and sign up to receive our emails or send a formal request to join on Orgsync.

Connect with Black Motivated Women on Facebook 

Faculty Faces features Queen Booker

EDITOR’S NOTE: Many of you have your favorite classroom mentor – that professor or instructor who made learning fun, who believed in you and inspired a passion to learn or pursue your dreams. If you have a faculty member you would like to see featured, send an email to csuinfo@mnsu.edu

Continental Traveler Seeks Global Community 

By Patricia Anyango
Graduate Assistant, CSU Communications

 

Queen Booker still needs to see the bottom of the world.

An associate professor of Management within the College of Business who loves to travel, Queen said many would be surprised to know that she has travelled to all the continents except Antarctica. Among her favorite – and most daring – journeys was her travels in Angola during the late 1990s.

“I loved the people and the most courageous thing I ever did was travel there to determine what aid was needed for civilians who were trying to survive the civil war,” she said. The payoff was knowing that what she was doing in Angola had a positive effect.

A native of the Mississippi Delta, Queen has always been passionate about helping communities and making them stronger. She has worked with the Ford Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other nonprofit organizations focusing on economic empowerment of rural communities.

Although her background is in community development, Queen got into academia to serve as a resource and source of encouragement to students.  Helping them see the importance of community and economic development is at the heart of her teaching philosophy.

“Be engaged, think and look outside your classroom and yourself and look at how you can make a difference in your community,” is her advice to students.

Besides the classroom, Queen offers guidance to students involved with African Students’ Organization for Development and Progress (ASODP), Liberia Student Association & African Student Association (ASA). In and outside the classroom, Queen remains actively involved in the advancement of diversity on campus. You may also find her singing some of the R&B classics in Centennial Student Union during daytime karaoke events.


I would like for students to remember me as someone who genuinely cared about their long-term success and well-being. –  Queen Booker


Queen holds a doctorate from the University of Mississippi, an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and a bachelor’s from Harvard University. During her 14 years at Minnesota State Mankato, she has taught subjects like Principles of Management, Ethics, Operations Management and Management Information Systems.


If she had a superpower, what would it be? 12 questions with Queen Booker

  1. What did you do for fun growing up? I was and still am a complete bookworm. I read books. My early favorites were the Child Craft books and World Book encyclopedias followed closely by the Sam and Ann adventure series, especially in the later books where the authors focused on Greek and Roman mythology.
  2. What is your favorite childhood memory? When I was in first grade, I was named homecoming queen of our elementary and middle schools. It was the one and only time I have ever been Queen Queen!
  3. Would you rather watch a movie or read a book? Oh in a heartbeat: Read a book!
  4. Which superpower would you choose? I would chose the power to summon the elements of a storm (lightning; rain; wind; snow) like Thor.
  5. Which fad do you wish would come back, and which do you wish would disappear?  The fad that I wish would disappear is the practice of wearing pants around the hips and the one I wish would come back is men opening the car door for women.
  6. Do you collect anything? I collect post cards and t-shirts. Instead of taking pictures when I travel I purchase post cards and t-shirts to recall my favorite memories of my trips.
  7. What would you do if you weren’t a professor? If I weren’t a professor, I would most likely have been a writer of “love inspired” religious novels.
  8. What does your perfect day include? A perfect day for me is one where it snows and then it stops before I have to drive in it! I love the snow but hate driving in it!
  9. Who is your hero/heroine? I don’t have a specific hero/heroine. But I admire anyone who is willing to stand up for what they truly believe as long as it doesn’t bring harm to others or themselves.
  10. Where in the world would you like to live? I would love to live in the Mississippi delta again. There is just something about being able to get peaches and plums fresh off the tree!
  11. If you could go back in time, what year would you travel to? If I could go back in time, I would go back to 1982 and relive my first year of college. I made many mistakes during that first year including but not limited to eating too many Nutty Bars and Oreo cookies that caused me miss a few classes. Missing those few classes could have ended my academic future but I was lucky enough to have professors who cared enough to address my problem and helped me to continue my education. Being a professor now, I realize how important it was to have caring professors but I also know that it was my responsibility to take care of myself. So I would go back and be a better person during that first year of college.
  12. If you could share a meal with any 3 individuals, living or dead, who would they be?  If I could share a meal with any three individuals, I would choose my mom, my maternal Aunt Mae Bell and my maternal grandmother Gertrude all of whom have passed on. I never had the chance to share a meal with them at the same time although all three had a profound impact on the woman I now am.

September 2017 RSO: MSU Mankato Swing Dance Club

                                                                                            Swing Dance club members

Get to know MSU Mankato Swing Dance Club

  1. What is the focus of your organization? To teach people how to swing dance and create a fun and welcoming environment for meet new people.
  2. When did your organization start on our campus? How many members do you currently have? We started in 2006 and we have roughly 20-30 members.
  3. How often do you meet? What offices do you offer within the chapter? We meet every Monday in either the ballroom of the CSU or the flex space next to the Bullpen of the CSU. Within the club we have the office of the President and Vice President as well as treasurer, secretary, and media positions.
  4. What are your goals? To teach swing dancing skills ( we have three types) and to create a social environment.
  5. What is the greatest achievement your organization has received? As a club we do not compete but some members have gone on to compete after learning how to dance at our club.
  6. How do you join? You show up with an open mind.
  7. Why should someone want to join your organization? Swing dancing is a skill that can be applicable throughout your life and is a great way to be social.

The Effects of Music on the Brain

  • Music keeps the brain active – even while sleeping
  • Instrumental music is more conducive to concentration
  • Surgeons perform better when listening to music
  • Music can reduce blood pressure and is a defense against anxiety, depression and stress
  • Types of music impact our relationships and willingness to help others.

Even if we listen to music in a passive state and largely as a means to relax or let go, music is anything but. Whether you use it when you exercise or during a power nap, your brain, when in contact with music, is working at full!

Since the 1950s, many studies have focused on identifying the action of music on the brain.

Music and Work

Not everyone has the same needs when it comes to music and work. Some prefer silence despite scientific proof that music helps to focus and improve efficiency and creativity.

In 1994, the Journal of the American Medical Association reported a spectacular difference in performance of stressful operations between surgeons operating with their music of choice versus those that operated in silence.

In general, instrumental music has been shown to be more conducive to concentration than alternative forms. Lyrics and singing may cause distraction even if it is in an unconscious manner. That being said, the type of work being done and the monotony of the task will affect this.

The Mozart effect

Listen to music and your body, in particularly your brain, will say thank you. With slower music, it can improve circulation and dramatically reduce blood pressure.

According to a 2004 study involving rats listening to Mozart, music generates a supply of calcium to the brain that produces dopamine, inhibiting the sympathetic nervous system and reducing blood pressure. This also explains why music acts as a defense against anxiety, depression and stress.

Music makes us better

Beyond the biological benefits of music, it is now proven that it even has impact on our relationship with others.

A 2009 study revealed that if one is subjected to a happy music, the people who surround us will seem happier.

Even more surprising is the experience of psychologists Rona Fried and Leonard Berkowitz of the University of New York: they subjected a group of students to listen to calm music; another to stimulating music; a third group to music producing negative emotions; and lastly one with no music at all. The students were then asked to render a service. Students submitted to the calming music were more likely to help (90%), followed by those in the third group and those who did not listen to music (60%) and in last, the group subjected to more negative music (45%).

Moral of the story: listen, sing, play! It’s good for the body and for the soul.

Taken From Karaoke Version Blog

Faculty Focus features TONYA BUTLER

Music Industry Professor Gains Perspective From Clint Eastwood ‘Spaghetti Western’

Tonya was the cover feature in the River Valley Magazine in September 2016. View the magazine and article here.

By REED CARR
CSU Public Relations Intern

Tonya Butler, professor of music industry studies, is a big fan of Clint Eastwood movies. “For a Few Dollars More” she finds a lesson in self-determination.

A scene in the spaghetti western has a reverend gunslinger on a train bound for Sante Fe – but he plans to get off in Tucumcari. When he’s told the train won’t stop there, he looks at the man and says, “This train will stop in Tucumcari,” and pulls the emergency cord.

“There’s just something about that scene that gets me,” Tonya said. “The way I feel is somebody is always telling you about what’s not gonna happen or what can happen. Well I say this train is stopping there. That’s how I feel about my whole life. Don’t tell me what this train is doing. I’ll tell the train where to go.”

Tonya’s “optimistic, outgoing, and out of sight” personality is revered by her students and faculty members. It’s even helped her win a spot on the television game show, “Let’s Make a Deal.”

“It was so much fun,” Tonya said. “Wayne [Brady] was cool. He was laid back, but he was there to work. I got to meet him and give him a hug on stage. I won a living room furniture suite, wireless stereo, iPod Touch, and a $500 gift certificate to iTunes.”

Her comfortability in front of large groups has given her more than just furniture and electronics. She recently won the Toastmasters Humorous Speech Contest for the entire state of Minnesota.

“Toastmasters has humorous speech and international speech each year,” Tonya said. “You give a speech at club level and win it, then you go to the area level which is a bunch of clubs, then you do it at the division level which is a bunch of areas, then at the district level which is a bunch of divisions. I’m supposed to enter the international speech competition this Thursday which goes all around the world.”

Tonya was used to the hustle and bustle of Los Angeles, where she worked as an entertainment lawyer. The Midwest lifestyle has been a big change.


“Living here in Minnesota and being at MSU has really taught me to take things in stride a little bit more.” – Tonya Butler


“I’m a lot more patient than I used to be,” she said. “I think it has something to do with the climate and the students here. Everyone is laid back and it kinda makes you laid back. Living here in Minnesota and being at MSU has really taught me to take things in stride a little bit more.”

Contributing to student’s education and making a positive impact is what motivates her. She wants to lead a life that gives back to people. With three years under her belt at Minnesota State Mankato, she’s helped spread big ideas and transfer her knowledge of the music industry to students who need it.


 You may not want to fly with Tonya Butler. Find out why in her 15-question quiz

  1. Favorite type of music? Earth Wind and Fire, Cameo, and Commodores
  2. Do you play any instruments? No, I’m the only faculty member in the department that that doesn’t play an instrument.
  3. What is it you like about music? I just love the way it makes you feel. There are very few things that can make you feel good when you’re feeling bad and music is one of them.
  4. Where is your hometown? Watts, California
  5. What did you do for fun growing up? Fun for me was singing in talent shows even though I wasn’t a great singer and reading and learning even outside of school. I was one of those kind of kids. I was a little nerdy.
  6. Would you rather watch a movie or read a book?    I would rather watch a movie. I like to see someone else’s interpretation. “The Good the Bad and the Ugly.” That is my movie.
  7. Which superpower would you choose?    I would not want to read minds or see the future. I know that. Super speed so I can run fast and do stuff fast.
  8. Which fad do you wish would come back, and which do you wish would disappear? I wish skinny jeans would go away. I wish bell bottoms would come back and platform shoes. I’d like flared leg jeans. I miss those.
  9. Do you collect anything? Yes, I collect black angels. So, whether they’re ceramic or wooden or little statues, dolls, paintings; anything black angel.
  10. Are you in any clubs or organization? I’m a member of The Recording Academy. I’m the chair of business and industry for the College of Music Society. I’m a member NABFEM, which is the National Association of Black Female Executives of Music and Entertainment.
  11. What would you do if you weren’t a professor? If I wasn’t a professor, I would be a motivational speaker. I like to share stories.
  12. What does your perfect day include? My perfect day would be waking up when I want to, speaking or teaching for an hour or two, going to the mall, shopping or watching a movie, and then just spending time with family. Nothing special. I don’t have to be on a yacht or on a beach. I’ve done all that.
  13. Who is your hero/heroine? I have a friend; her name is Rhea. She has bone marrow cancer. She is like the bravest, most spiritual, person I’ve ever known. She’s my hero.
  14. Where in the world would you like to live? I’d probably want to live somewhere back in California, in southern California somewhere because I’d be closest to my family.
  15. What is the most courageous thing you’ve ever done? Jumping down the slide on a plane that had to emergency land. You don’t want to fly with me. I’ve had it happen three times.

Faculty Focus features KRIS ROSACKER

Professor is ready to travel and get to know students on a personal level

By HALEY SEVERSON
CSU Public Relations Intern

Besides her classroom, College of Business Professor Kris Rosacker is ready to travel halfway around the globe to know students on a personal level.

“My biggest regret as a college student was I didn’t do a trip,” said Kris, a tax professor at Minnesota State Mankato. She’s made up for lost time by traveling with students to Europe and, most recently, on a January study tour to New York City. “I know some of the students didn’t necessarily have a best friend with and so I tried to reach out to those students in particular.” That willingness to engage is part of a teaching philosophy that values students by making time to know them – not just by name, but also by their interests and hobbies.

According to Kris, a perfect teaching day involves talking to her students, whether it’s in the classroom, during a meeting or even by email.

“I wasn’t involved as a student and so I try to connect with students and make sure everyone has someone to talk to,” she said.

That special trait is continually self-examined. Every year she reflects on her approach to teaching and sets goals to be better than the year before.

“I don’t compare myself to other people,” Kris said. “I compare myself to where I was a year ago.”

While such goal setting motivates her, she uses her own life to help demonstrate how unplanned things shape the greatest life experiences. Case in point – her spontaneous trip to India and the Taj Mahal: “It literally glowed in the sun. It took my breath away.”

On a simpler note, life outside the classroom includes walks with her husband and their two Biewer Terriers, Mocha and Cocoa, and spending quality time with her three children.

For someone who believes everyone should be comfortable being themselves, Kris added that “me time” may be spent listening to her favorite singers, Lady Gaga and Adele. “I like them because this is who they are, take me or leave me.”


‘Education is not something that happens to you, it is something that you do for yourself.’ – Kris Rosacker


For Kris, helping students find that balance of individuality and interaction makes being an educator – and education itself – special. “Education is not something that happens to you, it is something that you do for yourself.”


Learn what Kris’s biggest fear is and more!

  1. Who is your hero? My husband of 27 years is my hero. Bob is intelligent, compassionate, genuine, a great friend to many and a wonderful father to our three adult children.
  1. If you could live anywhere, where would it be? I was born and raised near Hastings, MN. After graduating from Minnesota State Mankato, I lived throughout the Midwest (OH, SD, NE, and WI) for 25 years before returning to MN. There is no place like home which is MN for me.
  1. What is your biggest fear? Failure.
  1. What is your teaching philosophy? The primary purpose of a university education is to prepare students to think on their own rather than to merely memorize and restate. Often this idea is simply stated as encouraging a life-long learning mentality. Furthermore, I take considerable efforts to learn the name and some personal background information (e.g., hometown, activities they enjoy, career goals) about each of my students. This serves to encourage a more personal relationship.
  1. What would you sing at Karaoke night? No, my voice is not intended for singing.
  1. If you could go back in time, what year would you travel to? I live in the present and plan for the future. If I traveled back in time I would miss out on what is going on today.
  1. How would your friends describe you? Nice.
  1. What are your hobbies? Walking has have been my primary hobby throughout life. In my opinion, the best way to learn about a new location (city, park, etc.) is to spend the day walking around without a real plan or destination in mind.
  1. If you could share a meal with any 3 individuals, living or dead, who would they be? My three children David (26), Tyler (23) and Sarah (20) as they are adults and live out of town. My husband and I cherish each moment we share with them.
  1. What is your favorite childhood memory? Holiday meals with my eight siblings, parents and grandparents—I am the sixth of nine children.
  1. What’s your favorite movie? “Mean Girls”, I have watched the movie many times with my daughter.
  1. Which of the five senses would you say is your strongest? I’m old, none of them are very strong anymore.
  1. What was your first job? My first full-time position was as an Enterprise System’s Instructor with the University of South Dakota.

FACULTY FOCUS featues Ellen Mrja

EDITOR’S NOTE: Many of you have your favorite classroom mentor – that professor or instructor who made learning fun, who believed in you, who inspired a passion to learn or pursue your dreams. In this issue, the inSIDER introduces Faculty Focus, a new bi-weekly feature spotlighting the human side of Minnesota State Mankato faculty members. Throughout the Spring Semester, we will bring you stories of instructors whose personal interests and ability to connect help make big ideas and real-world thinking a reality. If you have a faculty member you would like to see featured, send an email to csuinfo@mnsu.edu

‘Stay on Your Feet’ Against the Bull May Be a Life Lesson from Mass Media Professor’

By REED CARR
CSU Public Relations Intern

Ellen Mrja, mass media professor at Minnesota State Mankato, once fought a baby bull and won.

While in Mexico, Ellen and her sister saw a demonstration by one of the country’s top bullfighters. When he asked the crowd for volunteers, Ellen stepped into the ring.

“I took one side of the cape and he took the other,” Ellen said. “He told me, ‘Just relax, you’ll be fine.’ He made the bull pass a couple of times and all I could think was, ‘Ellen, stay on your feet. If you can stay on your feet, you’ve got half a chance of living.’ Sure enough, that bull went right through the cape.”

Maybe it’s her spontaneity and willingness to get involved that leaves a lasting impression among Ellen’s students. She loves coffee, she jams to The Beatles and, yes, she believes pineapple belongs on pizza.

And while her perfect day away from work includes reading a good book on her couch with her two Chihuahuas, Jade and Jazzy, she loves her time in front of a class.

“I’ve always known this is what I want to do. I’ve always known it. There are many days that I drive home saying, ‘I can’t believe I’m going to get paid for doing what I did today.’ It is so much fun.”


‘I hope my students remember me as passionate about their futures.’ – Ellen Mrja


She’s motivated by the energy that is exchanged between her and her students. During her 35 years with the University, Ellen has taught the ins and outs of subjects like media law and public relations, but she has also learned from her students.

“More than anything, my students have taught me that each one of them has a story to tell. I like to take the time to get to know them before we get to subjects in class. I hope my students remember me as passionate about their futures.”

She’d love to live in France where her daughter lives, or even in Italy where the streets are covered in statues from the Renaissance Period. For now, Minnesota State Mankato is fortunate enough to have her in the classroom teaching students about media and showing them how to stay on their feet.


If she wasn’t a teacher, what would Ellen Mrja be doing? 15 Questions With Ellen Mrja

  1. Favorite color? Red
  2. Favorite type of music? Old school
  3. Do you play any instruments? No
  4. Hometown? Hibbing, MN
  5. Did you play sports in high school? No, but I played softball and tennis outside of school.
  6. Would you rather read a book or watch a movie? Read a book.
  7. What is your spirit animal? The bear, because I’m protective of children and small creatures
  8. What word or words best describe you? Passionate, funny
  9. What three things would you need if you were stranded on an island? Coffee, book and I suppose I should take my husband too, huh?
  10. Which superpower do you wish you had? Invisibility
  11. Do you know any second languages? I’m very bad at French. I learned enough Spanish to pass graduate school exams, but I doubt I could read Spanish anymore.
  12. If you could bring one fictional character to life, who or what would you choose? Atticus Finch from “To Kill a Mockingbird.”
  13. Personal hero/heroine? My mother. She is the kindest woman I’ve ever known.
  14. If you hadn’t become a professor, what do you think you’d be doing? I really think I’d be a reporter In Washington D.C. covering the White House.
  15. What makes you happy? My life makes me happy.

RSO Takes Fill-in-the-Blank Approach When Recruiting Student Members

EWB Officers, from left, Jordan ZumBerge, Michael Seffren, Sam Stoffels and Yoseph Ukbazghi.

EWB Officers, from left, Jordan ZumBerge, Michael Seffren, Sam Stoffels and Yoseph Ukbazghi. See more photos at end of story.

Leaders with the Engineers Without Borders chapter at Minnesota State University, Mankato seek to expand their membership to all students on campus. Trouble is, the group’s name tends to scare away students.

Named the March 2015 Recognized Student Organization of the Month at Minnesota State Mankato, the club is finding that lifting typecasts is the first phase of recruitment and growth.

“We talked with the marketing club and they specifically said ‘the Engineers Without Borders name scares me off’ because it’s engineers,” said Michael Seffren, vice president of programs for the Minnesota State Mankato chapter of EWB.

The group now takes a fill-in-the-blank approach to recruitment that offers students opportunities to contribute and benefit from the group’s community focus.

“What we came up with was Underscore Without Borders,” Seffren said. “So if you’re a nursing major – if you’re a business major, marketing, finance, anthropology, history – whatever, put you’re major right in front of Without Borders. That’s the type of club we want to have.

“This club is open to every single student,” he added. “We will find a spot for you that you will enjoy doing.”
Seffren, along with EWB Chapter President Sam Stoffels and Jordan Zumberge, chapter secretary, shared the past and future of their student organization that traditionally focuses on international projects while transitioning toward more local community involvement.

Granted a campus chapter in 2009, EWB is part of an international Engineers Without Borders organization offering 140 professional and student chapters. EWB chapters partner with communities throughout the world to develop sustainable, reliable infrastructure that improves quality of life.

Since its inception, EWB at Minnesota State Mankato has been working with the community of Santa Rosa Senca, El Salvador, to improve the community’s water distribution system. The group is currently preparing for a week-long visit to Santa Rosa Senca in May.

“It is a student-led, student motivated, student-driven organization,” Stoffels said. “All aspects of the trip have to be student organized.”

To assist all areas of project development and delivery, Stoffels said the organization is working to expand its membership by recruiting students from across the curriculum who want to make a difference.

“Not only do our projects benefit the communities we work with,” Stoffels said, “they also benefit students by giving valuable skills that aren’t picked up in the curriculum. Especially the soft skills – planning, teamwork, leadership, presentation, fundraising and networking.”

Zumberge added that engineering students are needed for the technical work, but the group primarily seeks students ready to help others.

“Any student that really wants to do humanitarian work, make a difference and do more than just go get free pizza, those are the students we want – who are motivated to help people,” he said. “When I see the perfect vision for EWB, it’s walking through the CSU (Centennial Student Union) and saying ‘Hi’ to five or six non-engineering students that I know because they are in EWB with me.”

For the three club leaders, this spring’s trip to El Salvador will be their first international assistance venture. No members who made the trip two years ago will be joining them.

“We know the effects of having an upperclassmen-heavy organization,” Stoffels added.
As a result, the chapter concentrates on attracting younger students.

“A lot of our recruits are sophomores” Zumberge said. “At that age they know what they want to do with their life. They’re not new to campus anymore. That’s what we find is the ‘sweet spot’ in our recruiting.”

Along with student members, the EWB chapter also partners with a professional engineering mentor from SEH Engineering in Mankato. Dr. Stephen Druschel, P.E., from the university’s engineering department serves as the group’s advisor.

The three also gave “assistant advisor” honors to Ashley Strom, assistant director of RSOs at Minnesota State Mankato, for her help in networking with different RSOs and community groups.

“Ashley is a great connector,” Seffren said. “She’s linked me up with at least five different student leaders that all want to do things with us.”

While the international project is EWB’s primary focus, the group slates guest speakers and presentation to introduce students to useful information for sculpting their lives and futures. Another recent focus seeks opportunities for local volunteer work.

“We are looking at short-term, local volunteering events because the international travel only occurs at most twice a year for our student chapter,” Stoffels said.

Seffrens added some students have simpler goals for involvement.

“We want to do local stuff so that people who don’t want to travel can still participate,” he said. “Or they just want to put in an hour a week doing local volunteering with us.”

While proud to advance their international Engineers Without Borders affiliation, the three chapter officers remain committed to crafting – and exemplifying — a club that grows by helping others.

“It’s really what you want out of it. If you want something that will occupy a lot your time, it can occupy a lot of your time. If you don’t you don’t have to,” Stoffels said. “A lot of use are putting a lot of time and effort into this club because we truly believe in helping people. I can’t stop, basically.”

MavSync: https://orgsync.com/66916/chapter
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minnesota-State-University-Mankato-Engineers-Without-Borders/325841984225?fref=ts
Web Page: http://www.ewbmankato.com/
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Pay It Forward Is the Lasting Legacy Envisioned for Students Today, Leaders Forever

Students Today, Leaders Tomorrow YouTube

Members of Students Today, Leaders Forever believe their Pay It Forward tour during spring break is best summed up as: “Nine days, six cities, one life-changing experience.”

Since officially becoming a Registered Student Organization at Minnesota State University, Mankato this past year, STLF joins a national association of nearly 23,000 students committed to leadership growth through community involvement.

At Minnesota State Mankato, STLF has rapidly established its organization as it reaches out to potential new members. Thus far, 31 students have registered to join this year’s tour that runs during Spring Break March 7-15.

Stops for their first tour from Minnesota State Mankato include Rapid City, S.D.; Casper, Wyo.; Rock Springs, Wyo.; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Grand Junction, Colo., before meeting with other STLF tours in Denver for a leadership gathering.

Among STLF’s founders at Minnesota State Mankato, Bradley Rod and Jessica Farah said the group’s mainstay PIF tour provides real-world experiences through community service seeking to make a difference.

A transfer from the University of Minnesota, Duluth, Bradley participated in his first PIF tour after he was “sucked into it by my roommate.”

Last year, Bradley and fellow Minnesota State University student Abdollah Shaferi joined the tour from the College of St. Scholastica. The experience from a distant campus was bittersweet.

“You make all these friends and then you don’t see them for a year,” Bradley said.

Afterwards, he petitioned the national STLF organization to start a chapter here.

Jessica, who participated in her first of six tours while a student at the U of M, is now a MBA graduate student at Minnesota State Mankato and serves as STLF’s graduate advisor. Like the other five founding members, Jessica remains constantly energized by STLF and the PIF experience.

“I talk about it 24-7,” she said.

Her motivation grew from her first experience with PIF when she participated in her first tour eight weeks after arriving from Lebanon.

“I was the last one on the bus so I sat alone at the very front of the bus,” Jessica recalled.

Just as she was thinking she made an awful mistake that would last for the next several days, another student on the bus sat down next to her.

“She said you want to watch a movie with me?” The two became “buds” by sharing Jessica’s ear buds. More friendships grew during the tour. “I came back and I had 40 new friends.”

During the nine-day tour, students spend a portion of their time assisting community projects in five different cities. Time is also set aside for sightseeing. At night, the group participates in various leadership building activities.

In each of their visits, actions by PIF participants are demonstrating that “these young people are making a difference.”

Jessica remembers a stop during her first tour where their work in a small community involved painting fire hydrants from yellow to red. The local school dismissed classes so students could assist PIF members in the community project. At day’s end, the appreciative community hosted a huge barbecue for the touring group.

Bradley recalls a darker memory from Indianapolis, Ind., where the group was helping a not-for-profit group reclaim what had become a neighborhood flop house. Among the needles and a bed frozen to the flooded basement floor was a collection of children’s toys. The scene imprinted the reality of life and how simple acts can make a difference.

Jessica and Bradley agree that leaving a lasting legacy on campus and across the nation is an important part of starting their STLF chapter at Minnesota State Mankato.

“I definitely have a lot of pride,” said Jessica about her STLF involvement. “To have a lasting impact on campus is huge for me.”

Bradley added he hopes what he helped create will remain part of the campus culture for years to come.
“Maybe my kids will come here,” Bradley added. “It would be great to say, ‘Oh, there’s still an STLF chapter here.”

If the growing number of students committed to Paying It Forward is any indication, the STLF should enjoy a long run at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

The national Students Today, Leaders Forever started in 2003 after four University of Minnesota freshmen sat in their dorm room brainstorming ways they could make a difference in the world. Their grass-roots dreaming has evolved into 582 PIF tours-to-date from campus chapters across the country. Participating students join alternative spring break adventures to various communities to assist with philanthropy events and community projects.

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