Professional Networking Made Easier With LinkedIn

Career Development Center Offers Help With LinkedIn, Resumes and More

By BRETT MARSHALL, CSU Public Relations Intern

There’s an old saying that goes, “It’s not what you know. It’s who you know.” That statements rings true for a lot of people, but especially college students.

The importance of building connections and networking is vital for the success of young professionals. It can provide an inside route to hard-to-get positions, provide great mentorship opportunities and be a source for professional resources.

A great way for students to start building their professional network started is getting a LinkedIn account.

“LinkedIn is a powerful way to professionally network with recruiters and employers,” Karina Clennon, Assistant Director for the Career Development Center at Minnesota State, Mankato said. “Students can apply for positions, stay connected with faculty after graduation and find where alum are working.”

But just having a LinkedIn isn’t enough. Clennon says it’s important to find ways to make it stand out to separate yourself from other students and job-seekers. She offered a few tips to students looking to better their profiles.

“Include key words for positions you are applying to in your headline. Be sure to ask faculty and supervisors to write you a recommendation on LinkedIn, include all of your skills and keep your profile up to date,” she said.

‘Include key words for positions you are applying to in your headline. Be sure to ask faculty and supervisors to write you a recommendation on LinkedIn, include all of your skills and keep your profile up to date.’ – Karina Clennon

In addition, Clennon said students need to make sure they have a professional picture displayed, not a selfie or cropped picture. She also recommended that students should include all information they would have on a resume as well as other professional experiences that may not fit on a resume.

Clennon also stressed the importance of using multiple resources and not being entirely reliant on LinkedIn during the job search.

“LinkedIn is a tool. It’s really important to leverage all of your resources when you are on the job search. Make sure you’re talking to your advisors and mentors for more information about careers,” she said. “Keep up to date with your online presence, too, because employers do take that into consideration when making hiring decisions.”

The CDC works closely with the Colleges of Allied Health and Nursing; Business; and Science, Engineering and Technology by providing programs and activities to students within those colleges. Students not in those colleges can visit the Career Development Center any time during the school day to get help creating a LinkedIn profile, feedback on resumes and cover letters and to seek career advice.

Clennon is a graduate of MSU with a Doctorate of Education in Education and Supervision as well as a Master of Science in Counseling and Student Personnel: College Student Affairs. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies from Bethany Lutheran College in Mankato.

The Career Development Center is located on the second level of Wigley Administration building and is open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information about the CDC or to schedule an appointment, visit www.mnsu.edu/cdc.

 

‘Embrace Your Voice’ Is Theme for Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Taken from March 28, 2018, University Media Relations News Release

Focusing on the national theme of “Embrace Your Voice,” a month of programming during Sexual Assault Awareness Month is planned for April by the Violence Awareness and Response Program at Minnesota State Mankato.

According to Laura Schultz, VARP coordinator, a series of events throughout the month are planned on campus to raise student awareness about sexual violence and prevention of sexual violence. Programming provides tools and resources needed toward ending sexual violence.

Recognizing the power of one’s voice can range from practicing or providing consent to speaking out against stereotypes or gender biases, she added.

All the events are free and open to the public. Events that require an RSVP are noted on the month’s schedule. For more information, contact Laura Schultz at laura.schultz-1@mnsu.edu or 507-389-5127.

EXTREME MAKEOVER: Field House Edition

by BRETT MARSHALL, CSU Public Relations Intern

One of the Midwest’s largest free-standing (4 walls only) facilities is going to have an entirely new look in Fall 2018.

Myers Field House is set to undergo a $740,000 renovation that will bring new floors, a fresh paint job, updated artwork and new logos to the facility. Some of the renovations began over Spring Break and will continue through the summer with focus on upgrading the floors.

“This is the original floor from December 2001, and the wear and tear over the past 16 plus years requires us to replace it,” said Todd Pfingsten, MSU director of Campus Rec.

The new floors will receive an updated color scheme as well. The track, which, according to Pfingsten, sees “the majority of the wear and tear,” will be purple. The infield courts, which are lined for basketball, volleyball, tennis and badminton will be a charcoal gray. The area between the courts will be a lighter shade of gray.

The walls will spirit the school colors of purple, gold and white. Pfingsten said students and faculty can look forward to seeing some new artwork and logos on the walls as well.

The painting began over spring break and is expected to be completed no later than the end of June. The floors will be installed beginning mid-June and finished by early September, just in time for the school year.

Pfingsten said the project is being funded primarily by two sources. The flooring project, which costs $737,580, is funded by a special allocation from university reserves. The painting project, which costs about $3,500, is being funded by departments who normally occupy the facility.

Myers Field House is a shared facility by human performance for classes, athletic practices and collegiate track meets, and for Campus Rec programs like open recreation, sport clubs, indoor climbing and adventure education programs.

The upgrades will benefit many people beyond those who use it regularly as Todd Pfingsten and Campus Rec host a variety of campus and community events including: Welcome Week, Family Weekend, concerts, Relay for Life, the Mankato Marathon Expo, youth and high school athletic tournaments, science fairs and more.

For more information on Myers Field House and MSU Campus Recreation, visit http://mnsu.edu/campusrec.

CSU Features Celtic Songs by Lehto & Wright

St. Patty’s Primer: Serendipity Music Series Welcomes Guitar Masters March 14

Just in time for a St. Patty’s Day primer, Minnesota guitar masters Lehto and Wright bring their traditional Celtic and American folk/rock sound to their first appearance with the Centennial Student Union Serendipity Music Series.

The duo’s free two-hour daytime performance will be Wednesday, March 14, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the CSU’s Lower Level Flex Programming Space.

According to Dirty Linen, the national newsfeed for folk and world music, Steve Lehto and John Wright are “.. among North America’s best practitioners of Anglo-Celtic folk-rock… wonderfully intricate, powerful guitar-driven music…”

Lehto and Wright’s accomplished twin guitar/mandolin approach features “unplugged” song sets ranging from Irish tunes to American spirituals. Their musical style, shaped by such influences as Jethro Tull, Miles Davis and King Crimson, challenges the boundaries of the traditional Folk genre.

The CSU’s ongoing Serendipity Music Series is a mid-day, mid-week, “street corner serenade” series that seeks to expose students, the campus and the Mankato community to a range of genres by Minnesota musicians. Lenny Koupal, coordinator of the series, said it was “serendipity” to come upon Lehto and Wright.

“Lehto and Wright came recommended by Tim Cheesebrow, a Twin Cities singer/songwriter who performed here in January,” Koupal said. “What a pleasant surprise to find Celtic music was in their wheelhouse and they were available for a daytime, pre-St. Patty’s gig. Two hours of free, top-notch tunes should help set the Irish mood and once-again expose our community to the wealth of talent among Minnesota musicians.”

 

 

Preparedness Still A Solid Defense Against An Intruder

By REED CARR, CSU Public Relations Intern

The recent school shooting in Florida once again has people wondering, “what should I do in that situation?”

Some think school faculty should carry guns—some think that’s the wrong place to start.

“The argument for teachers and professors carrying firearms is that this possibility would cause someone contemplating violence in a school from carrying this out,” said Sandi Schnorenberg, head of campus security. “First, carrying a firearm is very big responsibility and not one everyone is willing to accept. You first must ask yourself whether you would be mentally and emotionally able to point the firearm at another living person and pull the trigger.”

Carrying a firearm is a huge responsibility, especially when you’re expected to use it to protect other people.

“Once you have answered the question about whether you are mentally capable of owning and using a firearm, you must then decide whether you are willing to practice with your firearm so that you become familiar with and proficient in the use of the firearm,” she said. “Without doing so, you become a hazard to many others should you have to use the firearm for protection.”

Campus security is constantly working to further develop a solid defense against an intruder.

“We have layers of systems in place at the University to reduce the chances of a shooting incident. We have staff here 24/7 patrolling and monitoring campus, prepared to intervene if we encounter suspicious or concerning behavior (which is a common precursor to violent incidents),” she said. “We encourage our community to let us know if they see any suspicious or concerning behavior, and have staff available 24/7 to follow up on reports.”

MSU campus security are unarmed. They collaborate with the Minnesota Department of Public safety to help come up with a game plan in an active shooter situation.

“I meet with DPS (Department of Public Safety) frequently and we will participate in training and exercises with them to further define what our roles will be if an incident happens on campus. DPS actively trains and drills for active violence incidents and are part of a regional public safety group that are working together to prepare themselves should an active violence incident happen here or in the community.”

One thing anyone can do, is notify authorities whenever you hear about a possible threat.

“What strikes me about the Florida incident is the number of people that knew that this particular student was capable of and had threatened violence.  We all have a responsibility and a duty to come forward when we see someone who is displaying violent tendencies.”

Students and faculty can report information about a possible threat by calling (507) 389-2111.  If they wish to remain anonymous they can report a threat at https://www.mnsu.edu/student/alert/ or make a Silent Witness Report at https://www.mnsu.edu/security/silentwitnessreport.html.

‘Discovering Yourself’ Series Helps Your Personal and Academic Success

Continuing through the Spring Semester, the Counseling Center again offers a series of personal discovery workshops to help guide students through typical troubling waters of college life.

The series, “Discovering Yourself,” offers sessions that tackle topics that typically  trouble students. The FREE 50-minute Spring 2018 sessions in CSU202 resume this Wednesday, Feb. 28, at 1 p.m. with helpful tips on Avoiding Academic Burnout.

Other topics include conflict resolution, healthy living, body compassion and – just in time for finals week – taming test anxiety.

The sessions happen at different times of the day to accommodate various class schedules.

Do yourself a huge favor. Check the remaining list of classes (right), choose your sessions, mark your calendars and attend.

Such tips for success are never a waste of time.

Also know that your Counseling Center offers students free consultation, individual counseling and group counseling to support students in resolving personal, social, educational, and mental health concerns.

The Counseling Center is located in CSU 285. Fall and Spring Semester hours are Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4:30 p.m., and 7:30 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. during summer semesters.

 

 

5 College Student Horror Stories from a Snow Day

Brett Marshall is a Public Relations Intern with the Centennial Student Union Communications Office.

by Brett Marshall

Snow days are usually days when students celebrate and rejoice, but sometimes they don’t play out that way. Here are five horror stories college students have had on a snow day.

1. I forgot to check my email and ended up going to school.

A truly horrifying realization. You put in the effort to get ready for the day and make your way to campus only to realize it was a ghost town. Now you must trek back through a blizzard and crawl back into your warm bed that you could’ve stayed in in the first place.

2. I still had to go to work.

No school is great, but some people are unfortunate enough to have to go work. And aside from the extra cash in your bank account, it’s four to eight hours of maybe one to two customers coming through the door.

3. My snow blower didn’t work.

There’s nothing worse than having a snow day and having the one thing you need to clear the snow break down. Usually a snow day means copious amounts of white fluff piling on up on your driveway or in your parking lot. You can’t ignore it, so instead, you have to  invest all of your energy in shoveling in hopes that you’re able to get your car out, which leads me to the next horror.

4. Chipotle had BOGO, but my car was buried.

The Madison Ave Chipotle had a BOGO Snow Day Special, but many students missed out on it due to their cars being buried under 13.5 inches of snow and treacherous road conditions. It was a rare occasion where Chipotle just wasn’t quite worth it.

5. I went into a ditch.

Yep, it can happen to anyone. Sometimes you think you’re superman or you really wanted that BOGO Chipotle or had to slump your way into work. Whatever the reason, you found yourself in the wrath of Mother Nature’s blizzard. You’re taking extreme caution, but your car doesn’t care. You start to go around a curve and the next thing you know your car is in the ditch. You sob softly wishing you had just stayed home today wondering why you live in a place that gets so much snow.

Alumni Memories Sought; Centennial Student Union Plans 50th Celebration Homecoming Day, Oct. 7


The Centennial Student Union invites students and alumni to join its 50th Anniversary Reunion Celebration on Homecoming Day, Saturday, Oct. 7.

Highlighting CSU reunion festivities during Minnesota State University, Mankato Homecoming Day 2017 activities will be an afternoon reception starting at 3:30 p.m. in the CSU Hearth Lounge. Other days activities will be a morning light breakfast, an invitation to participate in the Homecoming Day parade, and an evening “family friendly” event.

Mark Constantine, director of the Centennial Student Union, said activities celebrating the student union’s 50th anniversary will begin at the start of the Fall 2017 semester and continue through Homecoming 2017.

“We are reaching out to all alumni – and particularly our past CSU student employees – to return to the Centennial Student Union on Homecoming Day to help us celebrate,” Constantine said. “We also are inviting all alumni to share photos and memories shaped in the CSU as a part of a Fall ‘Serendipitous Memories’ art show planned in the CSU Art Gallery.”

“We are reaching out to all alumni – and particularly our past CSU student employees – to return to the Centennial Student Union on Homecoming Day to help us celebrate. We also are inviting all alumni to share photos and memories shaped in the CSU as a part of a Fall ‘Serendipitous Memories’ art show planned in the CSU Art Gallery.” – Mark Constantine

Photos and memories can be shared on the CSU 50th Anniversary website, www.csu.mnsu/50thAnniversary. Shared memories will be displayed in a CSU Art Gallery exhibit from August through the Homecoming celebration.

“Maybe the CSU is where you met your life partner, found a lifelong Greek community or discovered a personal passion,” Constantine said. “We want to share your CSU memories.”

The CSU also is creating a 50th anniversary display that will be used in the CSU throughout the 2017-18 academic year as well as with the University’s planned Sesquicentennial traveling display. The CSU display will include a video timeline featuring CSU directors, key staff members and special guests.

Faculty Focus features GUARIONEX SALIVIA

For Dr. Guarionex Salivia, the family business is teaching.

“My mom is a high school teacher, my father was a university professor and most of my uncles have taught at university level,” Salivia said. “My grandfather was a medical doctor and he was also a teacher. I have a brother who is finishing a doctorate who will be a professor, and two of my brothers are elementary schoolteachers. Everyone in my family is a teacher!”

Becoming a university professor was a natural result of growing up around so many academics, but his love for teaching goes deeper than tradition.


“Standing in front of all those people and having them somehow learn something from me; that is really exciting.”
– Guarionex Salivia


“Standing in front of all those people and having them somehow learn something from me; that is really exciting,” Salivia said. “That’s why I love teaching. Even if it’s only 10 percent of the students that get something out of the class. That’s what motivates me.”

Outside of school, Dr. Salivia likes to mountain climb, cross-country ski and catch up on the many Netflix series he has started. He also loves to play soccer.

“I used to play soccer in college so I’ve been trying to stay in shape for when the next opportunity arises,” Salivia said. “I try to connect with the students as much as I can, and in the context of sports, it would be nice to connect with a group of students that play soccer and would be open to involving faculty.”

Dr. Salivia is on the brink of getting his tenure promotion. He is excited to continue expanding his research and teaching spectrum at Minnesota State, Mankato.


Find out what his spirit animal is and why plus more in 10 questions with Guarionex Salivia.

  1. What is your favorite music? I listen to anything from Spanish rock to reggae. Lately, I’ve been listening to a lot of Bob Marley.
  2. Where is your hometown? I’m from San Juan, Puerto Rico.
  3. What is your favorite movie? Star Wars, but only the original trilogy. Not the prequels and not the enhanced versions. I read recently that Disney is going to release the original untampered with trilogy, and I cannot wait until that happens so I can get my hands on it.
  4. What is your spirit animal? The dragon. I was born in 1976, which is the year of the dragon in the Chinese calendar.
  5. What word best describes you? I like to think of myself as a highly collaborative person. I don’t know if that’s how people perceive me, but that’s how I would like to be perceived. I do my best to collaborate.
  6. If you were stranded on an island, what three items would you want? If I can choose anything, then a boat. A knife, a rope and a boat.
  7. Where in the world would you like to live? There is this one town I visited in the northwestern part of Italy where my ancestors from my mother’s side are from called Genoa, Italy. I loved it. It’s a port-town and it’s interesting because the town is built on a hill. It’s beautiful.
  8. Do you speak any second languages? My native language is Spanish, and I also speak Italian.
  9. If you didn’t have to sleep, what would you do with the extra time? Catch up on all my Netflix. I’m watching too much stuff and it’s hard to catch up.
  10. Do you have a hero/heroine? I look up to my father a lot because he was also a university professor. I think of him as a figure to emulate. I rely a lot on my wife, not just for support, but also because we compliment each other. It’s not about heroics, it’s about life experiences.

Trends in College Programming

What’s Trending At Minnesota State?

Programming Director Sees Millennials

As Wanting To Be ‘Part Of The Event’

By Lenny Koupal, Centennial Student Union Communications Coordinator

A recent EDM Concert hosted in the Centennial Student Union by the Student Events Team provided a multimedia production with live streaming as techno-savvy students seek more interactive entertainment.

Part of the continuing effort for keeping higher education relevant is adjusting the university experience to ever-changing trends.

University campuses such as Minnesota State University, Mankato continually seek greater diversity among faculty and staff to meet the expanding cultural demographics of its student body. Other challenges and opportunities involve responding to the needs of distance learners as online classes appeal to students across the state or just across campus.

For Bill Tourville, assistant director of campus programs, his Student Events Team within Student Activities at the Centennial Student Union must balance events between a generation of students that either wants to get an education and get out – or those that want to interact.

“The days of sitting and watching are over,” Tourville said. “Today’s Millennials and Gen-Y’ers want to interact. They want to be part of the event.”

Tourville said 15 years ago, the entire lineup of campus programming would have been performances.


“The traditional performance style is outdated. Students want to be part of something bigger” – Bill Tourville


“That’s not okay anymore. The traditional performance style is outdated. Students want to be part of something bigger,” he said.

Among the most popular traditions coordinated by the Student Events Team is the annual CSU Haunted House. Much of the entire 215,000-square-foot student union turns into Halloween Spook Central as various student organizations put together their idea of scary. Hundreds of students line-up to be engaged and engrossed in the moment.

Campus versions of game shows and cosmic bingo, exotic animal day and even organized snowball fights are on the students’ wish list of events.

Tourville said another balancing act is national name recognition versus unique experiences. Students on one hand are most comfortable with “national prepackaged stuff” whether its movies or concerts or lectures.

“Unless it’s a national name, most students are not interested,” he said. “Unless a friend is in a band or it’s a national name, they won’t go.”

On the other hand, students are drawn to unique, interactive experiences. Many of those involve some level of technology whether it’s smart boards in student union meeting rooms or spaces that are flexible, communal gathering places.

For concerts, Tourville said the trend is to direct dollars to production as well as performance. A recent Electronic Dance Music performance in the CSU blended music with a multimedia experience.

“Some schools are spending a third of their concert budget on production – lights, sound, décor – students are wanting that experience,” he said. “It’s not only about the performance but about the experience they had.”

Within those type of interpersonal events is the growing trend in live streaming. At Minnesota State Mankato, Tourville said Facebook live streaming at concerts starts in the morning and continues until they contractual must shut down the site.

“Two of the artists at our EDM concert were Facebook live streaming the entire concert,” he added.

When, where and how live streaming is allowed is now creating issues that need to be addressed.

Tourville adds that social media continues to be a trend that needs constant attention. Even then, organized programs or departments are viewed as outsiders in students’ social media circles. Snapchat is the latest trend in the social media landscape.

“Snapchat is not going away,” Tourville said. “It’s how (students) are connecting with their friends. That is how they are communicating on an interpersonal level.”

While Facebook is a popular communication tool, it doesn’t reach into a student’s inner circle.

“Facebook is your public persona, Snapchat is more private,” he said. “Today’s students seek a place where they can just be personal and we can’t reach them. They can be private on Snapchat.”

Tourville said the trend is to take a different Facebook approach by providing good content that they can use personally.

For student life professionals, these changing trends for the Millennial generation means – perhaps now more than ever – the continuing trend of vigilance, flexibility and creative ideas that keep the college experience fresh and memorable for a diverse, individualized and interactive array of college students.