Therapy Dog Sessions Return Sept. 20 at 6:30 p.m.

Health 101 Students Can Attend To Fill Class Requirement

The dogs are back!

Hound Hugs and Kanine Kisses, the monthly therapy dog session hosted by the Centennial Student Union, will be Thursday, Sept. 20 in the CSU Lincoln Lounge.

This year’s sessions will have minor changes from last year’s popular event said Lenny Koupal, CSU communications coordinator.

“The new time will be 6:30 to 8 p.m.,” said Koupal, who coordinates the CSU Program. “The group is now known as Paws for Friendship. It will be the same volunteers and their wonderful dogs. They just go by a different name.”

For several years, the CSU has offered therapy dog sessions – first as a Finals Week StressBuster event.

“We added monthly therapy dog sessions after students requested more frequent therapy dog visits. We’ve designated the third Thursday of each month throughout the academic year as Hound Hugs and Kanine Kisses night.” Koupal added.

The event is free. Visitors need only to sign University’s liability waiver.

Koupal said the event remains among the most popular activities in the CSU.

“In last spring’s CSU student survey, students ranked the therapy dog sessions as the third most popular reason for coming to the CSU behind Career Fairs and Stomper’s Cinema,” Koupal said. “These sessions are both welcome and needed as students move through their academic year.”

Dr. Mary Kramer, faculty member with the department of health science, said students enrolled in the Health 101 are encouraged to attend therapy dog sessions as part of three required wellness activities. Students then share their experiences as part of their assignment.

“The reflections are phenomenal,” Kramer said. Some share personal reflections. Others observe the impact the dogs have on other students.

“For some, it reminds them of home and their dog,” Kramer added. “It helps them forget about high anxiety issues in their lives.”

Kramer said the health science department is working on a survey on the impact of therapy dog sessions on college students.

“We are interested to learn more about therapy dogs and students.There’s so much research on the benefits, yet there’s almost nothing out there on (the impact on) college students. ,” Kramer said. “There’s just something we don’t understand on the power of the dog – just putting a hand on a dog – that energy transfer between the person and the dog. It’s magical.”

Food and Other Basic Need Resources

by: Afure Adah

There are a lot of cool services that are offered to students here at MSU and a lot of students don’t know about them. Here are some cool services that I recently found out about that are super helpful. As students we are sometimes reluctant to seek out service, but hopefully if we know about them it won’t be as hard to anymore.

Campus Kitchen

During the school year, Campus Kitchen collects food from local restaurants (like Panera and Olive Garden among plenty of other restaurants) and makes it into meals for people facing food insecurity. Campus Kitchen (CK) rents space at the Crossroads Lutheran Campus Ministry, 331 Dillon Avenue, so that is where you can find it.

CK also hosts a bread cart and mini-fridge that is stocked with food in the entry of Crossroads where you can pick up some food if Crossroads is open but Campus Cupboard isn’t.

Campus Cupboard

Campus Cupboard is a food pantry in Crossroads where MSU students can come once a week with their MavCards, and grab one of each food items to put in their shopping bag. The food ranges from canned food, cereal and ramen, to refrigerated foods like carrots and eggs. There are also drinks like LaCroix.

Campus Cupboard is open every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., so definitely check it out!

Crossroads Ministries also hosts $1 lunches every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.. I personally have been to this and the food was so good and the fact that it was only $1 made it even better.

For more information on the wide range of resources and services available visit Camps Kitchen at our school’s Facebook page.

MSU’s Mavathon

by: Brett Marshall

One way the fraternities and sororities are giving back and shifting the conversation is their active involvement in MSU’s Dance Marathon, a student group dedicated to raising money for the Children’s Miracle Network and Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare. They also plan an event known as “Mavathon,” which is a 10-hour celebration of the year’s fundraising and also a final push to raise as much money as they can “For the Kids.”

Image may contain: 25 people, people smiling, indoor

Image courtesy of MSU Dance Marathon on Facebook

The committee that organizes the year-long fundraising is led by the IFC and PHC Vice Presidents of Community Service and Philanthropy.

“Dance Marathon is a good way to meet new people and get involved in something that creates an impact on campus, especially because we are MSU’s largest philanthropic organization,” Sarah McClain, the PHC VP of Community Service and Philanthropy, said.

MSU’s Dance Marathon has raised more money than any other dance marathon in Minnesota, already over $150,00 in its eight-year history, and is just one of the many ways that fraternities and sororities are making a positive impact on the campus and community and creating the ultimate college experience.

Sorority recruitment begins Thursday, Sept. 6 and runs through Sunday, Sept. 10. If you have interest in signing up, you can register by visiting https://maverickgreeks.mycampusdirector2.com/landing/. Any questions about sorority recruitment can be directed to Lexi Stauffacher at Alexandra.Stauffacher@mnsu.edu

Fraternity recruitment begins Thursday, Sept. 20 and runs through Sunday, Sept. 23. If you have interest in signing up, you can register by visiting https://www.mnsu.edu/activities/greek/prospective/fraternities.html. Any questions can be directed to Kevin Hines at Kevin.Hines@mnsu.edu.

If you have interest in learning more about or becoming a part of MSU Dance Marathon, you can contact Sarah McClain at Sarah.McClain@mnsu.edu. Also, be sure to mark your calendars for the weekend of February 23-24 as that is the weekend the dance marathon committee is planning on hosting Mavathon.

The Ultimate College Experience

by: Brett Marshall

If you came to Minnesota State seeking the ultimate college experience, everything you’re looking for may be right in front of you.

The Ultimate College Experience is the marketing campaign the MSU fraternity and sorority community has embraced for the past three years. The idea came about when previous fraternity and sorority leaders wanted to rebrand the community. They thought about the community’s values of friendship, scholarship, service and leadership and decided that those four things combined created the “ultimate college experience” for their members.

“It’s called the Ultimate College Experience for a reason. If you think about every aspect of college that would make it memorable, fraternity and sorority life covers it all,” Kevin Hines, the Interfraternity Council (IFC) Vice President of Recruitment said.

Image courtesy of MSU Fraternity & Sorority Life

Each of MSU’s fraternities and sororities have been hard at work recruiting motivated individuals who are seeking their ultimate college experience. They’ve already hosted several campus events including the Backyard Bash and Cosmic Bingo where they’ve met and interacted with prospective members.

Hines said there’s nothing to worry about when considering joining a fraternity or sorority and that it’s okay to take a leap of faith and go through recruitment.

“If you’re on the fence, go for it. You can really feel it out your first semester during the new member process. If you realize you don’t think it’s the right fit, you can always leave,” he said. “If you never try it, you will never know if it’s really something you will love forever.”

Lexi Stauffacher, the Panhellenic Council (PHC) Vice President of Recruitment, also encourages those on the fence with recruitment to give it a try.

“Even if you’re unsure about joining fraternity & sorority life you should give it a try because you have nothing to lose but everything to gain,” she said.

 

The two offered great insight into how fraternity and sorority life has given them the ultimate college experience. Hines reflected on the ability to recognize people everywhere he goes.

“I love getting to walk around campus and see familiar faces everywhere I go. I have at least one familiar face in each of my classes from fraternity and sorority life,” he said. “I also love how involved you get to be. The events we do as a community, like Greek Week and homecoming are so much fun and always bring smiles to everyone involved.”

Stauffacher said being in a sorority helped her grow individually and helped her build connections.

“Sorority life has helped me become the confident and more outgoing person I am today,” she said. “It’s also introduced me to some of the most important people in my life and I’m so thankful for that.”

Hines also touched on how the fraternities and sororities at MSU are trying to shift the conversations and stereotypes surrounding Greek organizations from negative to positive.

“We don’t haze on this campus and we are a community dedicated to giving back,” he said. “So many people just see the negative and we’re not like that on this campus. We really do emphasize all the positive aspects being in a fraternity or sorority.”

Sorority recruitment begins Thursday, Sept. 6 and runs through Sunday, Sept. 10. If you have interest in signing up, you can register by visiting https://maverickgreeks.mycampusdirector2.com/landing/. Any questions about sorority recruitment can be directed to Lexi Stauffacher at Alexandra.Stauffacher@mnsu.edu

Fraternity recruitment begins Thursday, Sept. 20 and runs through Sunday, Sept. 23. If you have interest in signing up, you can register by visiting https://www.mnsu.edu/activities/greek/prospective/fraternities.html. Any questions can be directed to Kevin Hines at Kevin.Hines@mnsu.edu.

University Policies and Protocols

By CYDNEY COFFEY, CSU Communication Graduate Assistant

For incoming students keep in mind that there are various consequences for drug and alcohol offenses. The general consequences for students for drug and alcohol are as follows through Residential Life:

  • First offense:
    • Probation for up to a semester
    • Completing an online course that covers being under the influence of marijuana or alcohol depending on the students’ offense
  • Second offense:
    • Probation for up to a year
    • Completing an online course that covers risk reduction and involves talking with other students
  • Third offense:
    • The students housing contract is terminated

The more a student racks up offenses the longer their probation will be, the disciplinary sanctions will become more serious and the educational sanctions will become more expensive as well. Dr. Mary Dowd, Dean of Students and Director of Student Conduct stated “We try and make it an educational process.”

A couple of important things to keep in mind for incoming students:

  • The police provide the University with weekly lists of names of students who are cited for drug and alcohol uses off campus. This includes DUIs as well as students who were transported to detox.
  • Police are out in MASSES on campus during the first 8 weeks of school. Take into consideration that there have been situations where a student has been arrested 3 times in just one week!

Dr. Mary Dowd, stated “Bottom line, it’s all about safety.”

The University strives at having the student’s best interest at heart.

FOR ALL SAFETY MATTERS, INCLUDING CONCERNS ABOUT A STUDENT’S MENTAL HEALTH – CALL UNIVERSITY SECURITY 24/7 (507) 389-2111; or DIAL 911 IN AN EMERGENCY.

 

How the University Takes Disciplinary Action

By ALEJANDRO REYES VEGA, CSU Communications Student Assistant

Minnesota State University, Mankato has made many changes to its student disciplinary process. One of the major changes happened after the landmark case Dixon V. Alabama State Board of Education.

The 1961 case allowed the establishment of the rights of students to be given notice of the allegation and an opportunity to be heard prior to expulsion. Moreover, students are not entitled to the same degree of due process as afforded in criminal and civil actions meaning that students have a different protocol when their disciplinary action is being decided.

The University has adopted the philosophy of educational discipline that promotes personal growth and accountability. It strives for fair and consistent policies and practices. For parents this means that we want students to learn from a “teachable moment” to consider consequences of their actions before acting on impulse or acceding to peer pressure.

It is important for parents to know when and how to intervene. Intervention sends a message to your students that you don’t trust their ability to handle their own affairs. Helicopter parenting can hinder the development of independence, self-esteem, and self-confidence.

The college experience strives to provide opportunities for your students to grow in the following areas:

  • Developing an identity separate from parents
  • Developing interdependence and competency
  • Managing emotions
  • Strengthening integrity and personal accountability
  • Establishing meaningful friendships and connections

To access the school’s parents’ resources CLICK HERE.

 

Types of Drugs and their Consequences

By ALEJANDRO REYES VEGA, CSU PR Student Assistant

The possession of Schedule Drugs has different consequences:

First Offense: Imprisonment of no more than 1 year and a minimum fine of $1000

1 previous drug/narcotic/chemical conviction will result in Imprisonment of 15 days-2 years, and a minimum fine of $2,500

2+ previous drug/narcotic/chemical conviction will result in imprisonment of 90 days-3 years, and a minimum fine of $5,000.

 

They are all illegal:

Drugs are illegal in the state of Minnesota. The only exception is medically prescribed marijuana; however, it is against University policy for students to possess any type pf drug including medically prescribed Marijuana.

The possession and use of Marijuana is a violation of federal law and since the University belongs to the State and accepts federal dollars for financial aid it must follow the Drug-Free Schools and Community Act.

There is no exception on the use of drugs and they are classified in five Schedules.

 

According to the DEA, these are the different schedules and drugs:

Schedule I.

These include drugs, substances, or chemicals are not currently accepted in any medical use and have a high potential for abuse.

Ex: Heroin, LSD, marijuana, ecstasy, methaqualone, and peyote.

 

Schedule II.

These include drugs, substances, or chemical that have a high potential for abuse potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence and are considered dangerous.

Ex: Vicodin, cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, dilaudid, Demerol, oxycodone, fentanyl, Adderall, and Ritalin.

 

Schedule III.

These include drugs, substances, or chemicals with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence.

Ex: Tylenol with codeine, ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone.

 

Schedule IV.

These include drugs, substances, or chemicals with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Schedule III drugs have a higher risk of abuse.

Ex. Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Ambien, Tramadol.

 

Schedule V.

These include drugs, substances, or chemicals with a lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consists of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes.

Ex. Lyrica, Parepectolin, Motofen, Lomotil.

 

The previously named drugs are just some examples, this is not by any means a full list of drugs that are considered illegal.

 

 

 

Alcohol and its Effects

by: Afure Adah

People often drink alcohol to celebrate, socialize or relax. But alcohol can often have strong effects. These effects vary from person to person and they depend on many different factors, including:

  • How much you drink
  • How often you drink
  • Age
  • Health status
  • Family history

The effects of alcohol can appear in about 10 minutes and as you continue to drink, your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level, increases. The higher your BAC, the more impaired you become. These effects include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Reduced inhibitions
  • Motor impairment
  • Confusion
  • Concentration problems
  • Breathing problems
  • Coma
  • Death

Some other risks can include:

  • Accidents and car crashes
  • Violent and risky behavior
  • Suicide and homicide

Long-term effects can include:

  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Health problems
  • Increased risk for certain cancers

REMEMBER: The legal minimum drinking age in the United States of America is age 21. In Minnesota, it is a misdemeanor violation punishable by up to a $1,000 fine and/or 90 days in jail.  The penalty typically starts out with a fine that is increased each time you get caught. Stay safe and make good choices!

 

College Dorm Room Checklist

Afure Adah

by AFURE ADAH, CSU PR Student Assistant

 

 

When I moved into the dorms for the first time, this was similar to the shopping list I used, it’s actually better. This is a very helpful checklist for dorm room shopping and preparing to move to college for the first time! It gives a list of shopping items and even some small tips. This checklist is a printable PDF so you can print it and check off the list as you go!

If you are moving into the resident hall that is off campus, Stadium Heights, I have a link for you too! 

One thing I found that I never noticed going into my freshman year, is that the residential life page has a service linked that makes getting bed and bath supplies for your dorm very easy. It’s like a one stop shop! This Company has been providing linens to students since 1997 and every purchase sends dollars back to your school for campus and housing programs. They also donate to various local charities and non-profits. Take a look!

MNSU Campus Security: Familiarize Yourself with Our Security Services

 

Afure Adah

by AFURE ADAH, CSU PR Student Assistant

 

 

Safety has always been an issue but in today’s day and age, things like, theft, assault and even human trafficking are becoming more prevalent. So here I will give you some info for staying safe on campus.
To stay safe on campus it is important to know the school’s security services. Here at MSU Mankato the security services that are specifically aimed to keep you safe and comfortable are:

Emergency phones
• Safe walk service
• Patrol & EMT

Emergency Phones
All over campus are emergency phones for easy communications with university security. They are bright blue and well lit, so they are easy to spot. If you would like to see a map of all their locations, I have one linked.

http://blog.mnsu.edu/csu/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/emergencyphones2015.pdf

Safe Walk Services
Our safe walk services provide a walking escort 24/7, year-round, to and from any university building, parking lot, or residence community. To request a Safe Walk, call University Security at (507)-389-2111.

I live off campus, about a 15-minute walk, and sometimes I am on campus super late and my bus isn’t running anymore, so I have to walk home. Not everyone has to walk all the way home, but there are students that park their cars in the lots that are a bit of a walk from the school and are often in a similar position as me.
I haven’t used this service yet, but during summer classes when my friends are not on campus or in town to walk with me or pick me up, I’ll probably give it a try. Better to be safe than sorry!

Patrol & EMT

As a student here, I have always noticed Security patrolling in the evenings, checking classrooms, and locked doors, making sure no one is where they are not supposed to be.
But the University Security Patrol unit is available 24/7, 365 days a year to perform the following duties:

• Provide 24/7, 365, vehicle and foot patrols
• Investigate theft, vandalism, and other crimes
• Security for campus events
• Help faculty, staff, students, and visitors
• Compile info for MSU incident reports
• Act as a liaison with the Mankato Department of Public Safety

EMTs and First Responders are employed by the University Security to respond and provide care for injuries, or illnesses on campus. In addition, they work closely with Health Services, and Gold Cross Ambulance Service.

If You would like more information, Campus Security’s page will be linked below.

https://www.mnsu.edu/security/services/